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Saturday, February 2, 2013

How Do you Learn from Twitter Chats and WallWisher

Ok, I will be honest, having done two twitter chat sessions for etmooc, or should I say following them while they flew by. I was not a fan! Tweetdeck did help a lot. I was able to follow #etmchat as well as see those messages directed at me. A very nice tool.I will be honest, I'm still not sure how to make an actual connection on these chats, they go so fast, yet I see many who appear to have already made connections and consistently tweet to one another on subjects I'm sure began way before I came in. Maybe they are already connected.. maybe they are new to each other but I see them, connected to two or three and I wonder how they did it so quickly, I will keep trying but to be honest, I don't mind lurking in twitter chats, I still learn. I just feel bad I am not sharing through that medium..

The many comments I received on google plus regarding twitter chats helped a lot. So this week, I did as was suggested, I watched for a while and though I fell like a lurker, I found a post fly by composed by Natasha Allen where she shared her "wallwisher for web 2.0 applications" . Well before I knew if I clicked on the link and was introduced to wallwisher.com. Now this application may seem odd to some, ok, I can put blocks on a wall but for me, it is very powerful. I am a visual person. While my wall is not nearly complete and I love google reader, my reader is a list, if the "post title" does not entice me, I may not read it.

This I can see! It adds a bit of visual perspective to something that is linear. My feeds, wiki's and blogs all on one pretty page is a great idea. What I am most impressed with is how very easy is was to learn, click and add, click and add. It's easy to say the least and I can see great implementation of this in education at all levels. If you use wallwisher.com, please tell me how, currently I am thinking of adding a new wall with resources for my graduate students though that would be redundant from the moodle page they currently have? Or it is possible they like the pretty pictures like I do? Hm...

7 comments:

  1. Hi. Enjoyed your post and loved the fact that you provided great links. It's so much better with links. I do have one question: I was very interested in reading the comments you are referring to about twitter chats. I clicked on the link to go to your G+ page but couldn't find the comments. I need some insight into making chats effective.

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    1. happily. When you click on my google plus link, you have to scroll down to the post on google plus I'm afraid once you click on my profile in google you will see all of my posts,if you scroll down you will see. "Anyone else have a hard time with the tweet session last night. Even with filtering, it went so fast... I got dizzy. Not sure if I'm a fan...
      #etmooc".
      There are 18 comments underneath, if they do not show, click on the "18 comments" link on the left. If anyone has a better way in google plus I'd love to know. If I didn't answer your question, please let me know and thanks so much for commenting. Twitter chats are not easy but that is just my opinion.

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    2. Oh, Thank you so much for mentioning my links. I try to teach it to new bloggers and it was inforced in the T1S4 – Advanced Blogging w/Sue Waters #etmooc session on advanced blogging with Sue Waters. I have left the link in case you might enjoy.

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  2. Hi Sherry

    I admit I only occasionally participate in Twitter chats and it isn't deliberate. If I'm online, and notice a conversation I want to join, I'll just add my thoughts.

    Sometimes the easier option is to feed the #hashtag into Flipboard so you can easily review each link and what was said after the chat then tweet at a person if you want to ask more questions.

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    1. Tried flipboard today, it is better, thanks Sue!

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  3. Saw your post in Google+ for ETMOOC, and know some colleagues use Wallwisher. I introduce many tools in my Integrating Technology and Literacy course, and was wondering if it was worth introducing Wallwisher. The students are already blogging with Blogger, using Google Reader, creating a class wiki with Wkispaces, creating digital stories, and using a variety of tools to implement a Literacy Project with their own students. Some popular tools used for the Literacy Project include VoiceThread, GoAnimate, Storybird, XtraNormal, Bitstrips, Weebly, and Popplet. Should I even include Wallwisher? Is it a tool that they would use well with younger students to promote literacy skill? Yes, they have choices for the Literacy Project, but unless they are made aware of possible tools, they will stick to the ones I recommend or others in their class recommend. We already use Diigo, but that is for their own professional needs, and not necessarily a tool they will implement for their Literacy Project. All have already created an Animoto, and now they are moving on to a digital story using software or apps like iMovie, MovieMaker, and PhotoStory 3. Okay, so would Wallwisher be worth it?

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    1. I'm hoping to get more comments on Wallwisher or have time to play with it more, I will certainly let you know! It appears we have a lot in common, I teach similar concepts at the masters level as well. Try looking at Scratch programming from MIT. Great for digital storytelling at all ages!

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